Posts Tagged: art

From Baukunst to Kunstwelt: The Biennialization of Architecture

There is no doubt that architecture is an art. The eternal question is which kind. Is architecture a building art? A social art? A visual art? A performance art? An urban art? (though that seems to have other connotations these days) All of

From Baukunst to Kunstwelt: The Biennialization of Architecture

There is no doubt that architecture is an art. The eternal question is which kind. Is architecture a building art? A social art? A visual art? A performance art? An urban art? (though that seems to have other connotations these days) All of

Observations on Attitude

[Originally published in Log Journal #32] Visiting “Fair Enough,” the satirical exhibition in the Russian Pavilion, I was reminded of The Boutique at the 1984 Miss General Idea Pavilion, an installation by the Canadian artist collective General Idea in Toronto in

Observations on Attitude

[Originally published in Log Journal #32] Visiting “Fair Enough,” the satirical exhibition in the Russian Pavilion, I was reminded of The Boutique at the 1984 Miss General Idea Pavilion, an installation by the Canadian artist collective General Idea in Toronto in

Seeing Things

Mountain architecture is very different from its flatland counterpart. (I know this may be stating the obvious, but I’m referring to buildings situated at high altitudes in very rugged terrain, and not buildings fashioned to remotely ‘look’ like mountains, such as,

Seeing Things

Mountain architecture is very different from its flatland counterpart. (I know this may be stating the obvious, but I’m referring to buildings situated at high altitudes in very rugged terrain, and not buildings fashioned to remotely ‘look’ like mountains, such as,

Pure Shit (II)

This building in the Catalan Pyrenees is a perfect example of the kind of “pure shit” that constitutes 98% of everything that is designed and built today. Yet another ordinary masonry construction topped with corrugated fiber cement board panels, the absolute cheapest roofing material on

Pure Shit (II)

This building in the Catalan Pyrenees is a perfect example of the kind of “pure shit” that constitutes 98% of everything that is designed and built today. Yet another ordinary masonry construction topped with corrugated fiber cement board panels, the absolute cheapest roofing material on

Everything is Art

ARCO art fair, Madrid. In September 2012, the fiscally and socially retrograde People’s Party governing Spain raised the value-added tax on most items to 21%, breaking one of its most-repeated election promises and causing damage to a culture industry already battered

Everything is Art

ARCO art fair, Madrid. In September 2012, the fiscally and socially retrograde People’s Party governing Spain raised the value-added tax on most items to 21%, breaking one of its most-repeated election promises and causing damage to a culture industry already battered

Ice Fishing in Gimli, a book project by Rob Kovitz

One of my favorite publishers, Treyf Books, is celebrating its 25th anniversary. To mark the occasion, Treyf is offering, for the first time, Ice Fishing in Gimli, a book project by my good friend Rob Kovitz, as a downloadable PDF that can be purchased online. Weighing

Ice Fishing in Gimli, a book project by Rob Kovitz

One of my favorite publishers, Treyf Books, is celebrating its 25th anniversary. To mark the occasion, Treyf is offering, for the first time, Ice Fishing in Gimli, a book project by my good friend Rob Kovitz, as a downloadable PDF that can be purchased online. Weighing

Provocative Architecture?

In “Little Frank and his Carp”, a 2001 video of a performance by artist Andrea Fraser, architecture, replete with its institutional frame, becomes a stimulus for masturbation. Is this architecture at its most provocative? No, unless this was part of

Provocative Architecture?

In “Little Frank and his Carp”, a 2001 video of a performance by artist Andrea Fraser, architecture, replete with its institutional frame, becomes a stimulus for masturbation. Is this architecture at its most provocative? No, unless this was part of