Posts Tagged: Barcelona

Super-Islands

The city block is a fundamental element of urbanism. The Ancient Romans called a city block an insula, or “island”, which is also how the Catalan language refers to it: illa (Curiously, Castilian Spanish uses the word manzana, or “apple”). In densely built up cities

Super-Islands

The city block is a fundamental element of urbanism. The Ancient Romans called a city block an insula, or “island”, which is also how the Catalan language refers to it: illa (Curiously, Castilian Spanish uses the word manzana, or “apple”). In densely built up cities

Revisiting Casa Bloc

  The architecture of housing differs fundamentally from the architecture of other building types in that it is never a purely qualitative consideration: unlike a singular custom house, “housing” raises issues of standardization, modular repetition, aggregation and urban morphology. With housing, especially the

Revisiting Casa Bloc

  The architecture of housing differs fundamentally from the architecture of other building types in that it is never a purely qualitative consideration: unlike a singular custom house, “housing” raises issues of standardization, modular repetition, aggregation and urban morphology. With housing, especially the

Dis-fru-tar

[Originally published in Azure, November-December 2015] Disfrutar means “to enjoy” in Spanish. It’s an appropriate name for a restaurant that encapsulates several aspects of the original modernist city plan for the area. The Eixample district of Barcelona was originally mapped out

Dis-fru-tar

[Originally published in Azure, November-December 2015] Disfrutar means “to enjoy” in Spanish. It’s an appropriate name for a restaurant that encapsulates several aspects of the original modernist city plan for the area. The Eixample district of Barcelona was originally mapped out

/ Rant

Cycling Barcelona versus Copenhagen: an Experiential Comparison

The other day I read an interesting critique of Barcelona’s cycling infrastructure titled “The Arrogance of Space”, by the Copenhagenize Design Company. As an avid cyclist living in Barcelona, and having recently visited Copenhagen on a week-long study trip with a group

/ Rant

Cycling Barcelona versus Copenhagen: an Experiential Comparison

The other day I read an interesting critique of Barcelona’s cycling infrastructure titled “The Arrogance of Space”, by the Copenhagenize Design Company. As an avid cyclist living in Barcelona, and having recently visited Copenhagen on a week-long study trip with a group

Size Isn’t Everything: A House Inside a House by Josep Ferrando

  [Originally published in Mark Magazine #57] It’s been said that the most difficult thing to design in architecture is a house. No, not an airport, a hospital, a skyscraper, or even a mass-housing project for that matter; but a

Size Isn’t Everything: A House Inside a House by Josep Ferrando

  [Originally published in Mark Magazine #57] It’s been said that the most difficult thing to design in architecture is a house. No, not an airport, a hospital, a skyscraper, or even a mass-housing project for that matter; but a

The Art Studio-Museum

[Originally published in Oris Magazine #92] Situated on the distant side of the forested hillcrest that overlooks Barcelona, the Arranz-Bravo Studio by Garcés – de Seta – Bonet Arquitectes is a tranquil, daylight-filled, introverted chamber of monolithic concrete set amongst trees

The Art Studio-Museum

[Originally published in Oris Magazine #92] Situated on the distant side of the forested hillcrest that overlooks Barcelona, the Arranz-Bravo Studio by Garcés – de Seta – Bonet Arquitectes is a tranquil, daylight-filled, introverted chamber of monolithic concrete set amongst trees

Selfie Scene

With the invention of the ‘selfie’, the traditional comic foreground or carnival cutout is rendered obsolete, along with the profession of carnival portrait photographer. Now, any props or scenery must be situated behind the photographic (and photographing) subject, so as to maximize liberty of movement

Selfie Scene

With the invention of the ‘selfie’, the traditional comic foreground or carnival cutout is rendered obsolete, along with the profession of carnival portrait photographer. Now, any props or scenery must be situated behind the photographic (and photographing) subject, so as to maximize liberty of movement