Posts Tagged: landscape

Overarching Craft

[Originally published in The Architectural Review July/August 2018] Matola, a hamlet in the semi-desert of the southeastern Spanish province of Alicante, Valencia, is a tiny crossroads that sports a community centre, health club, hardware store, supermarket, bakery, and several bar-restaurants

Overarching Craft

[Originally published in The Architectural Review July/August 2018] Matola, a hamlet in the semi-desert of the southeastern Spanish province of Alicante, Valencia, is a tiny crossroads that sports a community centre, health club, hardware store, supermarket, bakery, and several bar-restaurants

Disappearing Act: Empúries Visitor Reception Centre by Fuses-Viader Arquitectes

[Originally published in Baumeister 9/2017] As the place where Ancient Greeks first set foot on the Iberian peninsula, the archaeological ruins of Empúries —from the Greek “Emporion”, meaning “trading place”— are a heritage site of European significance. Founded by colonists

Disappearing Act: Empúries Visitor Reception Centre by Fuses-Viader Arquitectes

[Originally published in Baumeister 9/2017] As the place where Ancient Greeks first set foot on the Iberian peninsula, the archaeological ruins of Empúries —from the Greek “Emporion”, meaning “trading place”— are a heritage site of European significance. Founded by colonists

Everyday Camouflage in the Countryside

The building above looks like a military installation of some sort, right? After all, it’s got a camouflage pattern on the façade. But no, its roof would also be presumably camouflaged if it were a military installation, which, as the satellite

Everyday Camouflage in the Countryside

The building above looks like a military installation of some sort, right? After all, it’s got a camouflage pattern on the façade. But no, its roof would also be presumably camouflaged if it were a military installation, which, as the satellite

Design and Decadence in Sabiñanigo

The land-scars of Spain’s construction boom-gone-bust have been documented photographically to great extent. More typically than not, these images portray a landscape of newly built but rather mediocre housing stock sitting empty; or else streets devoid of any buildings whatsoever and leading nowhere. Among the many failed developments throughout Spain, however,

Design and Decadence in Sabiñanigo

The land-scars of Spain’s construction boom-gone-bust have been documented photographically to great extent. More typically than not, these images portray a landscape of newly built but rather mediocre housing stock sitting empty; or else streets devoid of any buildings whatsoever and leading nowhere. Among the many failed developments throughout Spain, however,

Seeing Things

Mountain architecture is very different from its flatland counterpart. (I know this may be stating the obvious, but I’m referring to buildings situated at high altitudes in very rugged terrain, and not buildings fashioned to remotely ‘look’ like mountains, such as,

Seeing Things

Mountain architecture is very different from its flatland counterpart. (I know this may be stating the obvious, but I’m referring to buildings situated at high altitudes in very rugged terrain, and not buildings fashioned to remotely ‘look’ like mountains, such as,

Pure Shit (II)

This building in the Catalan Pyrenees is a perfect example of the kind of “pure shit” that constitutes 98% of everything that is designed and built today. Yet another ordinary masonry construction topped with corrugated fiber cement board panels, the absolute cheapest roofing material on

Pure Shit (II)

This building in the Catalan Pyrenees is a perfect example of the kind of “pure shit” that constitutes 98% of everything that is designed and built today. Yet another ordinary masonry construction topped with corrugated fiber cement board panels, the absolute cheapest roofing material on

Barcelona’s Disappearing Green Façades

Barcelona’s ‘green façades’ are disappearing at an alarming rate. A part of this city’s vernacular tradition, the small balconies typically used by apartment dwellers for growing plants are slowly being emptied one-by-one. Plants grown on balconies would sometimes cover entire building façades. Retirees and balcony-gardening aficionados would

Barcelona’s Disappearing Green Façades

Barcelona’s ‘green façades’ are disappearing at an alarming rate. A part of this city’s vernacular tradition, the small balconies typically used by apartment dwellers for growing plants are slowly being emptied one-by-one. Plants grown on balconies would sometimes cover entire building façades. Retirees and balcony-gardening aficionados would