Posts Tagged: Spain

A Guide to the Many Flags Visible in Barcelona These Days

[Originally published in Art4d Magazine] Barcelona is currently festooned with flags hanging from apartment balconies. It’s been this way especially since 2010, when the Spanish Constitutional Court in Madrid, responding to a legal challenge presented by the then recently elected

A Guide to the Many Flags Visible in Barcelona These Days

[Originally published in Art4d Magazine] Barcelona is currently festooned with flags hanging from apartment balconies. It’s been this way especially since 2010, when the Spanish Constitutional Court in Madrid, responding to a legal challenge presented by the then recently elected

Contemporary Ruins II

Further to my last post, here is another Spanish contemporary ruin by a Pritzker laureate: Toyo Ito’s spa near Torrevieja. The construction site was ordered shut down in 2004 by the Spanish Coastal Authority for infringing the coastal setback requirement of a

Contemporary Ruins II

Further to my last post, here is another Spanish contemporary ruin by a Pritzker laureate: Toyo Ito’s spa near Torrevieja. The construction site was ordered shut down in 2004 by the Spanish Coastal Authority for infringing the coastal setback requirement of a

Contemporary Ruins

As is well-known, Spain’s recent building boom-turned-bust has left behind a legacy of halted construction projects that are now in a state of decay. While most of these contemporary ruins are banal and rather ordinary buildings, there is also a small

Contemporary Ruins

As is well-known, Spain’s recent building boom-turned-bust has left behind a legacy of halted construction projects that are now in a state of decay. While most of these contemporary ruins are banal and rather ordinary buildings, there is also a small

Everyday Camouflage in the Countryside

The building above looks like a military installation of some sort, right? After all, it’s got a camouflage pattern on the façade. But no, its roof would also be presumably camouflaged if it were a military installation, which, as the satellite

Everyday Camouflage in the Countryside

The building above looks like a military installation of some sort, right? After all, it’s got a camouflage pattern on the façade. But no, its roof would also be presumably camouflaged if it were a military installation, which, as the satellite

Avoid the Void

[Originally published in Mark Magazine #60] In recent decades, architecture commemorating violent death has typically relied on a dark, austere and markedly empty space to symbolize absence: the cathartic ‘void space’. For the Federico García Lorca Cultural Centre in Granada, however, architecture

Avoid the Void

[Originally published in Mark Magazine #60] In recent decades, architecture commemorating violent death has typically relied on a dark, austere and markedly empty space to symbolize absence: the cathartic ‘void space’. For the Federico García Lorca Cultural Centre in Granada, however, architecture

Design and Decadence in Sabiñanigo

The land-scars of Spain’s construction boom-gone-bust have been documented photographically to great extent. More typically than not, these images portray a landscape of newly built but rather mediocre housing stock sitting empty; or else streets devoid of any buildings whatsoever and leading nowhere. Among the many failed developments throughout Spain, however,

Design and Decadence in Sabiñanigo

The land-scars of Spain’s construction boom-gone-bust have been documented photographically to great extent. More typically than not, these images portray a landscape of newly built but rather mediocre housing stock sitting empty; or else streets devoid of any buildings whatsoever and leading nowhere. Among the many failed developments throughout Spain, however,

Tradition

It’s early January, and in Spain the Christmas shopping season is still in full swing. Aarrgghh! It’s all because of the age-old tradition of exchanging Christmas gifts on the 6th of January (for all you young children reading this: Epiphany is

Tradition

It’s early January, and in Spain the Christmas shopping season is still in full swing. Aarrgghh! It’s all because of the age-old tradition of exchanging Christmas gifts on the 6th of January (for all you young children reading this: Epiphany is